Chlamydia Screening in Women (CHL)

The percentage of women 16–24 years of age who were identified as sexually active and who had at least one test for chlamydia during the measurement year.

Why It Matters

Chlamydia is the most commonly reported bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the United States. It occurs most often among adolescent and young adult females.1,2 Untreated chlamydia infections can lead to serious and irreversible complications. This includes pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), infertility and increased risk of becoming infected with HIV.1 Screening is important, as approximately 75% of chlamydia infections in women and 95% of infections in men are asymptomatic. This results in delayed medical care and treatment.3

Results

Chlamydia Screening Rate (Total Rate)

YearCommerical HMOCommercial PPOMedicaid HMO
201850.647.658.1
201748.946.957.6
201648.344.957.3
201547.443.455.2
201447.042.954.6
201346.242.254.9
201245.142.357.1
201145.042.458.0
201043.140.057.5
200943.139.556.7
200841.738.054.9
200738.133.850.7
200637.330.452.4
200534.926.950.7
200432.2-47.2
200329.7-44.9
200225.4-40.9
200123.1-40.4

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 2014. “Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Chlamydia—CDC Fact Sheet.” http://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/STDFact-chlamydia-detailed.htm
  2. National Chlamydia Coalition. 2010. “Research Briefs: Developments in STD Screening: Chlamydia Testing.” 2010 Series, No. 1.
  3. Meyers, D.S., H. Halvorson, S. Luckhaupt. 2007. “Screening for Chlamydial Infection: An Evidence Update for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.” Ann Intern Med 147(2):135–42.

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