Cervical Cancer Screening (CCS)

Assesses women 21–64 years of age who were screened for cervical cancer using either of the following criteria:

  • Women age 21–64 who had cervical cytology performed every 3 years.
  • Women age 30–64 who had cervical cytology/human papillomavirus (HPV) co-testing performed every 5 years.

Why It Matters

Cervical cancer is a disease in which cells in the cervix grow out of control. Cervical cancer used to be one of the most common causes of cancer death for American women; effective screening has reduced the mortality rate by more than 50 percent over the last 30 years.1 Cervical cancer is preventable in most cases because effective screening tests exist. If detected early, cervical cancer is highly treatable.1

Results

Cervical Cancer Screening Rate*

YearCommerical HMOCommercial PPOMedicaid HMO
201875.273.559.3
201774.373.259.4
201674.373.058.0
201574.771.755.8
201476.373.860.2
201275.573.664.5
201176.574.466.7
201077.074.567.2
200977.374.665.8
200880.774.066.0
200781.773.564.8
200681.072.665.7
200581.874.665.2
200480.9-64.7
200381.8-64.0
200280.5-62.2
200180.0-61.1
200078.1--
199971.8--

*This measure has existed since 1999 and was updated in 2013 to reflect new guidelines from the US Preventive Services Task Force

References

  1. American Cancer Society. 2014. “Cervical Cancer Prevention and Early Detection.” http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/cid/documents/webcontent/003167-pdf.pdf Last modified December 11.

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