Breast Cancer Screening (BCS)

The percentage of women 50–74 years of age who had a mammogram to screen for breast cancer.

Why It Matters

Aside from some forms of skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, regardless of race or ethnicity.1 Screening can improve outcomes: Early detection reduces the risk of dying from breast cancer and can lead to a greater range of treatment options and lower health care costs.2

Results

BREAST CANCER SCREENING RATE
Commercial Medicaid Medicare
Year HMO PPO HMO HMO PPO
2016 72.7 70.2 58.9 72.1 72.5
2015 73.2 69.6 58.5 72.7 71.7
2014 73.7 69.9 58.8 71.7 69.1
2013 74.3 69.5 57.9 71.3 69.1
2012 70.3 66.5 51.9 69.9 67.5
2011 70.5 66.7 50.4 68.9 65.8
2010 70.8 67.0 51.3 68.5 65.8
2009 71.3 67.1 52.4 69.3 65.5
2008 70.2 66.0 50.8 68.0 65.2
2007 69.1 64.6 49.8 67.3 64.5
2006 68.9 63.5 49.1 69.5 68.6
2005 72.0 63.9 53.9 71.6 69.0
2004 73.4 - 54.1 74.0 -
2003 75.3 - 55.9 74.0 -
2002 74.9 - 56.0 74.5 -
2001 75.5 - 55.1 75.3 -
2000 74.5 - - - -
1999 73.4 - - - -

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 2013. “Breast Cancer Statistics.” http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/statistics/index.htm
  2. American Cancer Society. 2011. “Breast Cancer Facts and Figures 2013–2014.” http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@research/documents/document/acspc-042725.pdf

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