Connect with NCQA

twitter linkedin facebook google+ youtube pinterest

Report an Error

Use NCQA’s Feedback Form to report a broken link, or content error.

Appropriate Treatment for Children with Upper Respiratory Infection

This HEDIS Measure

Assesses children 3 months˗18 years of age who were given a diagnosis of upper respiratory infection (URI) and were not dispensed an antibiotic prescription. A higher rate indicates appropriate treatment of children with URI (i.e., the proportion for whom antibiotics were not prescribed).

So What?

Most URIs, also known as the common cold, are caused by viruses that require no antibiotic treatment. Too often, antibiotics are prescribed inappropriately, which can lead to antibiotic resistance (when antibiotics can no longer cure bacterial infections). Antibiotic resistance is a major health concern in the United States and around the world.1

Recent efforts to decrease unnecessary prescribing have resulted in fewer children receiving antibiotics in recent years, but inappropriate use remains a problem.1 Increased education and awareness of appropriate treatment for URIs can reduce the danger of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

References

1.      Centers for Disease Prevention and Control. 2013. “Antibiotics Aren’t Always the Answer.” http://www.cdc.gov/features/getsmart/

tables
Appropriate Treatment Rate
  Commercial Medicaid Medicare
Year HMO PPO HMO HMO PPO
2016  88.4 87.0 88.6 -- --
2015 88.3 86.7 87.8
2014 87.1 85.3 87.0
2013 85.2 83.2 85.2
2012 84.0 82.3 85.1
2011 83.9 82.0 85.3
2010 85.1 83.7 87.2
2009 84.1 82.5 86.0
2008 83.9 83.3 85.5
2007 83.5 83.0 84.1
2006 82.8 82.1 83.4
2005 82.9 81.9 82.4
2004 82.7 79.9